Will FourGuard Ensure Heartworm Protection?

by Kevin Wichlan
(TN)



First of all, I wanted to thank you for all the great products. I use DentaSure, TripleSure and FourGuard. Great results!

I do have one question when you have time to respond. Since I now use the FourGuard weekly on all 3 of our dogs, I no longer use the topical flea/tick/heartworm multi from our vet. That said, do you feel the FourGuard is a safe protectant from heartworms or should we use something else in addition to ensure heartworm protection?

I've also attached two photos of our 3 pups: Beau (Great Dane), Jack (White English Bulldog) & Foxy (Foxster-a Corgi mix and probably the alpha of the bunch).

Thanks again for your dependable products and service and for being a safe alternative for our four legged kids!!

Kevin Wichlan, Tennessee


Editor response:

Hello Kevin,

Thank you for using our products, and thank you for your thoughtful question about whether our FourGuard is a safe protectant against heartworm in your three dogs.

The four herbs we use in FourGuard - Gential root, Neem leaf, Cloves, and Papaya leaf - are either specific for, or complementary to, the prevention and extermination of worms and internal parasites of all kinds. Each herb has earned its place in the formula through thousands of years of clinical use (in both humans and animals) and empirical research in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ayurvedic, and/or Western medical herbalism. Moreover, above and beyond this "pharmacological" cause-and-effect action the herbs exert on targeted organs (including the liver, kidneys, and digestive tract), there is the physiomedicalist or "Vital" action the herbs evoke in your dogs. Without getting too theoretical, suffice it to say that the vital life force in your dogs is "directed" to specific areas where balance and proper functioning is needed. Where there is balance and good health, there is no disease or microbial infection. This is why an ongoing, weekly maintenance program of FourGuard is so effective.

At the same time, I think of remedies in general (including barbaric pharmaceutical drugs) the same way as I think of insurance. You don't need to insure for things that happen often and are of little consequence. Instead, you insure for things that don't happen often or may not happen at all, but if and when they do they're costly and disastrous. So, when it comes to the statistically rare possibility of heartworm in my dogs, which would be both costly and disastrous if it were to happen, I tend to err on the side of caution.

I give our two Dachshunds the FourGuard once a week based on dosing instructions for a daily dose. And once a year I have them checked over by a holistic veterinarian for basically everything including heartworm. If heartworm were ever found, I would have a decision to make at that point, but my decision would not be based strictly on conventional medicine or herbal medicine. Does the vet want to give my dog a chemical pesticide? First, justify your decision! Tell me about the active ingredient(s), the clinical findings especially the side effects, possible long term and/or collateral damage the drug may cause, and what rate of success have you actually seen?

While too many conventional vets toss off prescriptions like dog treats, there may be a set of circumstances where allopathic medicine is actually the most appropriate procedure, such as an advanced case of heartworm that poses imminent danger to the dog and where the dog's owner doesn't have the time or desire to work out an option that may also be less convenient. It always comes back to the dog's keeper and what they want to believe, which is sometimes very sad.

In any case, Kevin, you've asked a very good question and I hope this gives you an answer or at least more to consider. What's important here is that you are thinking about your dogs' health and happiness, and that's always a good thing.

Best regards,

Gary Le Mon

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